About Us

As a leader in providing care to older adults in North Texas, the Center for Geriatrics aims to empower seniors through exemplary clinical service, education, and research in order to lead the best quality of life possible.

 

Clinical Services
We provide primary care and geriatric consultations for older adults with complex or chronic conditions.

To schedule an appointment, call: 817-735-2200.

Our interprofessional Geriatric Assessment and Planning Program team works closely with both patients and their care givers to provide:

  • Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment
  • Primary Care of elderly frail and complicated older persons
  • Dementia evaluations and treatment with neurological and neuropsychological assessments
  • Elderly well care
  • Onsite care at several of Fort Worth’s Continuing Care Retirement Communities
  • House Calls
  • Palliative Care
  • Advanced Planning Care Assessments
  • Cognitive Assessment and Care Planning Services
  • Social Work Assessments
  • Pharmacy Consultations
Education Programs

(link: https://www.unthsc.edu/academic-affairs/igetit/sage/ Workforce Enhancement Healthy Aging and Independent Living (WE HAIL)  (link: https://www.unthsc.edu/health-institutes/institute-for-healthy-aging/center-for-geriatrics/wehail/)

We are transforming geriatric care in North Texas by improving training for health care professionals and caregivers. Through WE HAIL, UNTHSC teams with JPS Health Network, Texas Christian University and the United Way’s Area Agency on Aging of Tarrant County to better meet the health needs of our region’s rapidly growing population of older adults.

Seniors Assisting in Geriatric Education (SAGE)  (link: https://www.unthsc.edu/academic-affairs/igetit/sage/ )

SAGE strengthens geriatric training by partnering health care professions students with senior mentors in our community. The program consists of an educational curriculum and community-based outreach experience that increases our students’ opportunities for early exposure to older adults and issues in geriatrics.

Cargiver Programs

To schedule an appointment, call: 817-735-2200.

Our interprofessional Geriatric Assessment and Planning Program team works closely with both patients and their care givers to provide:

  • Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment
  • Primary Care of elderly frail and complicated older persons
  • Dementia evaluations and treatment with neurological

our Clinic

Pillars of Brain Health

YOUR BODY: GET MOVING. People who exercise regularly have a lower risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. Exercise improves blood flow and memory; it stimulates chemical changes in the brain that enhance learning, mood and thinking. Be fit. Be smart.
EAT SMART, THINK BETTER. You are what you eat. As you grow older, your brain is exposed to more harmful stress due to lifestyle and environmental factors, resulting in a process called oxidation, which damages brain cells. Rust on the handlebars of a bike or a partially eaten apple gives you an idea of the kind of damage oxidation can cause to your brain. Food rich in antioxidants can help fend off the harmful effects of oxidation in your brain.
CONTROL MEDICAL RISKS. Hypertension, diabetes, obesity, depression, head trauma, higher cholesterol, and smoking all increase the risk of dementia. You can control and reduce these risks. Get your annual check-up, follow your doctor's recommendations and take medications as prescribed. Get engaged in a brain healthy lifestyle for your body and your mind.
REST WELL. Sleep energizes you, improves your mood and your immune system, and may reduce buildup in the brain of an abnormal protein called beta-amyloid plaque, which is associated with Alzheimer’s disease. Practicing meditation and managing stress may help fend off age-related decline in brain health. Stay positive. Be happy.
YOUR MIND: USE IT OR LOSE IT. Mental exercise is just as critical as physical exercise in keeping your brain fit and healthy. Mental exercises may improve your brain's functioning and promote new brain cell growth, decreasing your likelihood of developing dementia. Like your muscles, you have to use your brain or you lose it.
STAY CONNECTED. Leading an active social life can protect you against memory loss. Spending time with others, engaging in stimulating conversation, and staying in touch and connected with family and friends are good for your brain health. Studies have shown that those with the most social interaction in their community experience the slowest rate of memory decline.