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Meet the Finalists: The Innovation Awards 2021

Thu, 10/15/2020 - 02:04
Presented by Dallas Innovates and D CEO

Now in its second year, the program from Dallas Innovates and D CEO honors disruptors and trailblazers driving a new vision for North Texas.

Dallas Innovates and D CEO are proud to announce the finalists for its second annual Innovation Awards. The program honors companies, CEOs, CIOS, CTOs, entrepreneurs, and other leaders who are helping to make Dallas-Fort Worth a hub for innovation.

All finalists will be recognized in the January/February issue of D CEO magazine and online at DallasInnovates.com; winners will be revealed at an exclusive awards event in January.

Here is the complete list of finalists for the 2021 program (along with links for extra information):

2021 Innovation Awards Finalists CIO/CTO of the Year

Chris Akeroyd, Children’s Health
Bill Lowrey, Istation
Prasanna Singaraju, Qentelli
Matt Winn, Dallas Baptist University

Corporate Innovator of the Year

Elyse Dickerson, Eosera
Will McClay, Dallas Cowboys
John Olajide, Axxess
Sanjiv Yajnik, Capital One

Innovation Advocate of the Year

Danny Chavez, McKinney Economic Development Corp.
Duane Dankesreiter, Dallas Regional Chamber
Dr. Hubert Zajicek, Health Wildcatters

Startup Innovator of the Year

Robert Atkins, BALANCED Media|Technology
Tony Goodman, PeopleFun
Rex Kurzius, Asset Panda
Kumar Narala, aBIa
Tom White, Phynd Technologies

Innovation in Cybersecurity

Milind Borkar, Illuma Labs
Rob Davis, Critical Start
Tiffany Ricks, HacWare
Bhavani Thuraisingham, The University of Texas at Dallas

Innovation in Finance

Boruch Greenberg, Payrix
W. Alexander Holmes, MoneyGram
Javier Martinez, Zirtue
Frank Santoni, ImpactX Partners
Craig Scheef, Texas Security Bank

Innovation in Food and Beverage

Chad Houser, Momentum Advisory Collective
Merrilee Kick, BuzzBallz/Southern Champion
Tyler Shin, Revolving Kitchen
Jim Stevens, Golden Chick

Innovation in Healthcare

David D. Halbert, Caris Life Sciences
Scott Kirksey, BenefitMall
Dr. Steve Miff, Parkland Center for Clinical Innovation (PCCI)
Stephen White, Center for BrainHealth

Innovation in Manufacturing and Consumer Goods

Bravis Brown, BPS Technology
Michael Hsu, Kimberly-Clark Corp.
Jason McCann, Vari
Phil O’Neill, Swiss American CDMO

Innovation in Real Estate

Stephen Lewis, Homematchx
Farrukh Malik, Roomored
Ryan Turner, RefineRE
Kyle Waldrep, Dottid

Innovation in Talent and Diversity

Russ Medina, NPower and AT&T
Jared Pope, Work Shield
Mandy Price, Kanarys

Innovation in Technology

Shar Dubey, Match Group
John Harlan, CrateBind
Aaron Fullen, K2View
Evelyn Torres-Gomez, Solaris Technologies Services

Innovation in Transportation

Will Coleman, Alto
Roger Raley, Alpine Advanced Materials
Rock Robinson, eCarra

Published on Dallas Innovates October 2020

The post Meet the Finalists: The Innovation Awards 2021 appeared first on Center for BrainHealth.

What a Brain Health Expert Says You Should be Doing Every Day

Thu, 10/01/2020 - 20:28
Center for BrainHealth founder Sandra Bond Chapman explains how to increase and extend your brainpower.

 

Over the past two decades, research has clearly established that the brain—the most complex entity in the known universe—has a lifelong ability to change, adapt, get stronger, and perform more efficiently. Our daily practices need to lean into this mental advantage.

At the Center for BrainHealth, we have made great strides in clinical trials investigating how far healthy individuals can increase and extend their brainpower by changing the way they deploy their brains to accomplish daily tasks. We are now translating these findings beyond the lab, into applications that people can learn to adopt. In short, we train people to take charge of their brainpower and become their brain’s CEO—the conductor overseeing all the moving parts.

The following are five science-based techniques to strengthen your brain health.

1. Put Your Brain in The Game By identifying two “expansive thinking” priorities to address each day when you are at your freshest. Give yourself no more than 45 minutes to complete a discrete aspect of your deep-thinking tasks. Eliminate the potential for distractions so you can focus on problem-solving and making decisions.  

2. Take “Brain Breaks.” Don’t just race from one hot project or meeting to the next; give your brain a break by taking a couple of minutes to intentionally disconnect from effort and inputs. The trick is to disengage your reasoning brain just long enough to recharge it. 

3. Practice Your Innovative Thinking. Make it a habit to consider multiple options, appreciate other perspectives, and challenge status-quo thinking to discover new approaches and solutions. This flexibility of thinking can improve your neural efficiency. 

4. Stop Multitasking. When presented with competing tasks that require thought, the brain rapidly switches between them; it does not simultaneously execute them. This toxic habit leads to shallow and less-focused thinking, depleted creativity, and increased risk of errors. 

5. Reboot Your Reasoning Brain By overriding your stress response. Learn to identify the markers: tense muscles, rapid heartbeat, shallow breaths. A quick and effective way to combat this response is to take five deep, slow “belly” breaths and simply let yourself be in the moment. 

By Sandra Bond Chapman, who is the founder and chief director of the Center for BrainHealth, a research and translational science institute of The University of Texas at Dallas. 

Published on D Magazine September 2020

The post What a Brain Health Expert Says You Should be Doing Every Day appeared first on Center for BrainHealth.

Center For BrainHealth’s New Advisory Board And TAG Members Announced

Thu, 09/24/2020 - 22:36

The Center for BrainHealth is in overload namedropping with its Advisory Board and Think Ahead Group (TAG) new members and leaders.

Starting off with the Advisory Board, Board Chair Roger Gault revealed the new members are Linda Asberry from KXAS Television, Kim Askew from DLA Piper, Debbie HernandezHattie Hill from T.D. Jakes Foundation, Sophia Johnson from Alpha Business Images LLC, Manoj Kutty from GreenLight Credentials LLC, Wendy Lopez from AECOM, Peter Milley from Potomac Royalty Partners LLC, Meredith Ryan from CNA Financial, Gail Warrior Suchy from CASPR Group, Amanda Coleman from Fort Worth ISD, Laura Gordon from LBG Marketing and Innovation, Marissa Horne from American Airlines and Michael Horne from Parkland Foundation, Mike Rials from STATinMED Research, Molly Soper from Brigade Events and Steven Soper from ExxonMobil Corporation, Mitzi Wadsworth from Global Realty Resources and Mike Wadsworth from McSmith Interests and Andy Walsh.

According to Center for BrainHealth Chief Director Dr. Sandi Chapman, “The movement to change how we think about the brain, its fitness and performance is in full force, and we are immensely thankful that this dynamic board is joining us in this important and timely mission.”

Regarding the TAG-ers, Co-Presidents Kristen Carter and Kendal Dodge are returning for a second year in the leadership roles. Joining the group that socializes as well as fundraises are Rachael CarterMakenna CovingtonAaron DigginsAlberto HernandezBora LaciJenna MartinMitch MasonMulvey McDavidJorden MoxleyKatelyn O’DonelTucker RobinsonKathryn SimmonsMorgan Tinsley and Emily Wingate.

Read full story on MySweetCharity.

Published on MySweetCharity September 24, 2020

The post Center For BrainHealth’s New Advisory Board And TAG Members Announced appeared first on Center for BrainHealth.

When productivity becomes an addiction

Tue, 08/11/2020 - 02:45
‘Productivity’ has become a buzzword with positive connotations – but what happens when getting things done is taken to an extreme?

Reza Jafery has been something of a workaholic since he was in first grade. Whenever he was assigned homework, he’d head straight for the library at the end of the day and would finish it before going home. Attending an elite high school in Dubai further spurred his desire to be successful, as did his hard-working parents. But he was driven more by compulsion than a love of learning, and became anxious if he didn’t have something in his sights to accomplish.

“I felt I had to reach particular milestones by a certain age or else I wasn’t successful,” says 27-year-old Jafery. “I told myself that I wouldn’t have to work as hard once I was successful, and that I’d be happy. But I hadn’t defined what success was andlife was just a constant race.”

Now living in Los Angeles, the self-professed productivity junkie has two jobs: he is the blockchain lead for a cryptocurrency company and the founder of a digital agency. Jafery works long hours “90% of the time”, which means working until midnight and at weekends and getting just five hours sleep for a few weeks at a stretch.

According to the chief director of the Center for BrainHealth at the University of Texas, Dr Sandra Chapman, the brain can become addicted to productivity just as it can to more familiar sources of addiction, such as drugs, gambling, eating or shopping.

“A person might crave the recognition their work gives them, or the salary increases they get,” says Chapman. “The problem is that just like all addictions, over time a person needs more and more to be satisfied and then it starts to work against you. Withdrawal symptoms include increased anxiety, depression and fear.”

Addiction is a brain disease that affects the brain’s reward system and results in compulsive behaviour despite the harmful consequences. However, the complicating factor with an addiction to productivity is that society tends to reward it – or at least casts it in a positive light. “It’s seen as a good thing: the more you work, the better,” says Chapman. “Many people don’t realize the harm it causes until a divorce occurs and a family is broken apart, or the toll it takes on mental health.”

Read full story on BBC Worklife.

Published on BBC Worklife August 9, 2020

The post When productivity becomes an addiction appeared first on Center for BrainHealth.

When productivity becomes an addiction

Mon, 08/10/2020 - 01:49

‘Productivity’ has become a buzzword with positive connotations – but what happens when getting things done is taken to an extreme?

According to the chief director of the Center for BrainHealth at the University of Texas at Dallas, Dr Sandra Chapman, the brain can become addicted to productivity just as it can to more familiar sources of addiction, such as drugs, gambling, eating or shopping.

“A person might crave the recognition their work gives them, or the salary increases they get,” says Chapman. “The problem is that just like all addictions, over time a person needs more and more to be satisfied and then it starts to work against you. Withdrawal symptoms include increased anxiety, depression and fear.”

Addiction is a brain disease that affects the brain’s reward system and results in compulsive behaviour despite the harmful consequences. However, the complicating factor with an addiction to productivity is that society tends to reward it – or at least casts it in a positive light. “It’s seen as a good thing: the more you work, the better,” says Chapman. “Many people don’t realise the harm it causes until a divorce occurs and a family is broken apart, or the toll it takes on mental health.”

Staving off the withdrawals

Addressing the warning signs – such as rushing through a family meal to return to work duties – and taking steps to modify compulsive habits is essential. The Center for BrainHealth’s Chapman suggests limiting the amount of time spent on an individual work task to 45 minutes or fewer, and not allowing interruptions, so as to create an opportunity for deep thought.

“You will use that time more efficiently and achieve a higher quality of output. Productivity junkies are more likely to spend valuable time chasing rabbits rather than focused work tending to ‘elephants’,” she says.

She also recommends creating a ‘not-to-do list’ to avoid overscheduling, and giving the brain essential opportunities for renewal to boost its performance. In a 2019 study of writers and physicists, a fifth of their most significant and creative ideas were formed during periods of ‘mind wandering’ – that is, when engaged with an activity other than work. The ideas that occurred during these break periods were also more likely to assist the professional in overcoming an impasse on a problem than if the idea had occurred while working.

“Take five minutes at least five times a day to completely stop. Turn off your technology and go outside,” says Chapman.

And as for sacrificing connections for work? The brain thrives on fun, laughter and meaningful relationships – so her advice is to make room for them no matter what. “At the end of peoples’ lives, they don’t wish they’d worked longer hours. They wish they’d spent more time with family or enjoyed the travel they got to do, but were never mentally present because they were checking their phone.”

Read full story on BBC Worklife.

Published on BBC Worklife August 9, 2020

The post When productivity becomes an addiction appeared first on Center for BrainHealth.

Doctoral Student Studying Multiple Sclerosis Earns NIH Fellowship

Mon, 08/03/2020 - 21:16

A University of Texas at Dallas doctoral student has received a National Institutes of Health (NIH) fellowship to help propel him along his path to becoming an independent research scientist.

Mark Zuppichini, a student in the cognition and neuroscience PhD program in the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences (BBS), received the Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award Individual Predoctoral Fellowship — a two-year, $41,000 grant intended to allow him to conduct dissertation research and obtain mentored research training.

His research examines how connectivity changes in the brains of people with multiple sclerosis (MS) relate to the cognitive deficits that come alongside physical symptoms of the disease.

“MS can be genuinely challenging — its onset typically occurs in the prime of one’s life,” Zuppichini said. “It affects mobility, cognition, quality of life, and is highly correlated with vocational ability — the ability to work. And to date, there aren’t many effective rehabilitation techniques for cognitive impairment.”

Working with BBS faculty researchers in the Center for BrainHealth (CBH) at UT Dallas, Zuppichini will use functional MRI techniques to measure neuronal, glial and vascular activity in the brain while study participants complete cognitive tasks, allowing the scientists to investigate the underlying neurological changes.

“We know that multiple sclerosis degrades the white matter that mediates function and communication between nerve cells and blood vessels,” Zuppichini said. “We think this degradation impedes neurons from firing persistently, which is critical for executing working-memory tasks.”

Zuppichini and his colleagues hope to provide information that could point the way to effective MS treatments down the road.

“We need to better understand the mechanisms by which MS impairs cognitive function to be able to help people,” the third-year doctoral student said.

“It has been notoriously difficult to find a form of cognitive rehabilitation to help MS patients. If I can help even in an incremental way to get us closer to understanding how memory dysfunction occurs in MS, then I’m super interested in doing so.”

Mark Zuppichini, a cognition and neuroscience doctoral student in the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences

Read full story on UTD Today

Published on UTD Today July 31, 2020

The post Doctoral Student Studying Multiple Sclerosis Earns NIH Fellowship appeared first on Center for BrainHealth.

DI People Make Executive Changes

Tue, 07/28/2020 - 02:02
In this week’s roundup of 27 hires and promotions in North Texas, you’ll also find news from Toyota, PHP Agency, abeo, KPMG, Haynes and Boone, Authentix, RealFoundations, Trinity Hunt Partners, BOK Financial, and more.

 

Across North Texas, companies are promoting and hiring people to take on leadership positions within their organizations.

Dallas Innovates covers prominent personnel moves in Dallas-Fort Worth businesses and nonprofits—from the newest startups to well-established companies. Here are the people moves tied to innovation and technology in the region.

UTD’s Center for BrainHealth adds to its Advisory Board

 

Roger Gault

At the University of Texas at Dallas’ Center for BrainHealth, Roger Gault and David Jacobs are joining the Advisory Board.

Gault will replace Ka Cotter’s role as advisory board chair and Jacobs will take over for Eric Bennett as vice-chair. The 100-plus member board said the two new appointments are well-suited for their jobs.

Gault is currently president of his own commercial real estate company, Gault Company. He has more than 35 years in the industry, having developed, invested in, or owned properties throughout the U.S.

David Jacobs

“I am honored and proud to serve the Center for BrainHealth and support the much-needed research they are doing to help preserve and restore brain health,” Gault said. “As chair of the advisory board, it is my hope that I can help further their mission and bring more awareness to the many programs and services the Center offers to help empower people of all ages to unlock their brain potential.”

Jacobs is one of the founding partners at E2M Partners, and served as the company’s chief financial officer, chief compliance officer, and member of the investment committee before retiring. He is now an investor, consultant, and business advisor.

“My wife Cher and I have been members of the advisory board of the Center for BrainHealth for 10 years. During that time we have witnessed firsthand the Center’s outstanding scientific research and advancements in education related to the brain,” Jacobs said. “With the opening of the Center’s Brain Performance Institute, BrainHealth has had and will continue to have an incredible opportunity to advance its mission of nurturing and ensuring healthy brains for all people everywhere.”

Read full story on Dallas Innovates.

Published on Dallas Innovates July 24, 2020

The post DI People Make Executive Changes appeared first on Center for BrainHealth.

GET YOUR BRAIN IN THE GAME

Tue, 07/21/2020 - 00:13

How is “the new normal” affecting you? With pressures coming at you from every angle, what do you do when you perceive that the demands placed on you exceed your ability to cope? Finding your way through these uncertain times calls for one thing above all: resilience.

By strengthening your brain’s capacity for resilience, you can effectively change your threshold of stress. Research has shown that by harnessing our executive function skills, we can down-regulate emotional responses to stress and sharpen our higher-order thinking. This makes us better problem solvers, decision-makers, and innovative thinkers.

By driving positive brain change, you won’t just bounce back from challenges – you can bounce FORWARD and UPWARD. Try these science-backed techniques to get your brain in the game.

The 2 + 5 + 7 Formula

Two – Identify two priority tasks each day that require deeper thinking, reasoning, and planning. Give them your attention when you are at your freshest. Limit distractions by turning off all digital notifications while you are concentrating. Allow no more than 45 minutes for each task, and then give your brain a break. Your brain and your work will thank you – as you experience being in the zone to think more efficiently and deeply.

Five – Take five minutes to rest your brain after a cognitively challenging task. Step away from technology, take a walk, observe your surroundings. Let your mind rest and wander just for a bit. Do this five times a day to recharge your brain, and you will come back refreshed, with reduced stress levels, and with a greater capacity to think deeply and creatively.

Seven – Be intentionally innovative seven times a day. Innovation is simply the flexibility of thinking. Explore perspectives that are different from your own. Approach a problem in an entirely new way. Practice two daily acts of kindness. Identify something that has gone stale from repetition and shake up the status quo. When you engage in innovative thinking, you are strengthening frontal networks and increasing neural efficiency.

Read full story on Prime Women.

Published on Prime Women July 15, 2020

The post GET YOUR BRAIN IN THE GAME appeared first on Center for BrainHealth.

Two Tapped for BrainHealth Advisory Board

Mon, 07/13/2020 - 20:29

Beginning Sept. 1, Roger Gault will take over Ka Cotter’s role as advisory board chair for the University of Texas-Dallas Center for BrainHealth. David Jacobs will take over Eric Bennett’s role as vice-chair.

Grateful to Cotter and Bennett for their leadership, the 100-plus member board said in a statement that they were certain that Gault and Jacobs are more than well suited for the job.

Roger Gault

Gault, a Preston Hollow resident, is president of Gault Company, a diversified commercial real estate company that develops and invests in a wide range of property types. With more than 35 years in the real estate industry, Gault has developed, invested in, or owned properties throughout the country.

He has a wide range of business and philanthropic leadership experience such as: being a member and former president of the Dallas Assembly, is a member of The Real Estate Council and serves on The Real Estate Council PAC board of directors, is on the advisory board of the Perot Museum of Nature and Science, the advisory board of the University of Texas at Arlington School of Landscape Architecture, served as a mayoral appointee on the City of Dallas Board of Adjustment and much more.

“I am honored and proud to serve the Center for BrainHealth and support the much-needed research they are doing to help preserve and restore brain health,” he said. “As chair of the advisory board, it is my hope that I can help further their mission and bring more awareness to the many programs and services the Center offers to help empower people of all ages to unlock their brain potential.”

David Jacobs

Similarly, Jacobs, a Midway Hollow resident, has his own wide range of experience in leadership and business. He was one of the founding partners, chief financial officer, chief compliance officer and member of the investment committee of E2M Partners, a company responsible for the structuring and management of a series of real estate equity investment funds.

Since his retirement from E2M Partners, he now works as an investor, consultant and business advisor. He also is a board member of Blanks Printing & Digital Imaging, Inc., World Affairs Council of DFW, previous president and current member of the Real Estate Financial Executives Association and The Real Estate Council of Dallas, served on the board and was head of a committee of Senior Source, served on the boards for Jewish Family Service and much more.

“My wife Cher and I have been members of the advisory board of the Center for BrainHealth for 10 years. During that time we have witnessed firsthand the Center’s outstanding scientific research and advancements in education related to the brain,” said Jacobs. “With the opening of the Center’s Brain Performance Institute, BrainHealth has had and will continue to have an incredible opportunity to advance its mission of nurturing and ensuring healthy brains for all people everywhere. When asked [to be vice chair], I wanted to continue to contribute my talents and leadership to this invaluable cause.”

 

Published on PeopleNewspapers July 10, 2020

The post Two Tapped for BrainHealth Advisory Board appeared first on Center for BrainHealth.

Brain Connectivity in Cannabis Users

Fri, 07/03/2020 - 20:05

Summary: Examining the brains of frequent cannabis users, researchers have identified a pattern of connectivity related to craving the substance. The findings add weight to the idea that brain regions do not work in isolation, but via the connectivity of multiple networks that signal to each other depending on state and need. Brain connectivity during cannabis cravings is not static but has fluctuations in connection patterns between the central executive network and nucleus accumbens.

Source: Center for BrainHealth

Researchers at Center for BrainHealth, part of The University of Texas at Dallas, recently examined underlying brain networks in long-term cannabis users to identify patterns of brain connectivity when the users crave or have a desire to consume cannabis. While regional brain activation and static connectivity in response to cravings have been studied before, fluctuations in brain network connectivity had not yet been examined in cannabis users. The findings from this study will help support the development of better treatment strategies for cannabis dependence.

The study was published in the journal of Human Brain Mapping (May 2020) by researchers Francesca Filbey, PhD, professor and director of cognitive neuroscience research of addictive disorders at Center for BrainHealth, Hye Bin Yoo, PhD and Blake Edward Moya.

The findings add to the understanding that regions of the brain do not perform in isolation, but through connectivity of multiple brain networks that signal to each other depending on need and state. It further identifies that brain connectivity during craving is not static, but rather, has fluctuations in connection patterns between reward-related regions such as the central executive network and the nucleus accumbens, areas rich in dopamine. It also highlighted the need to better understand the impact of these dynamic patterns as it relates to cannabis use. Participants were examined with a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scanner for these findings.

 

Read full story on Neuroscience News.

Published on Neuroscience News July 3, 2020

The post Brain Connectivity in Cannabis Users appeared first on Center for BrainHealth.

Mental Health Support for North Texas’ Frontline Healthcare Workers

Thu, 07/02/2020 - 20:27

How organizations are supporting their employees’ health needs and reducing stress during the pandemic.

The COVID-19 pandemic has increased the amount of feeling stress and uncertainty, DFW health systems are stepping up to provide mental health services to those on the front lines of the pandemic.

The Center for BrainHealth: Stress Resilience For Front Lines

The Center for BrainHealth has recently started the Stress Resilience for the Front Line. The free program gives healthcare workers and first responders virtual access to self-paced cognitive training programs covering topics such as stress and sleep solutions and building memory and reasoning, interactive Zoom resilience sessions led by the Center’s expert clinicians, and a video series discussing tips on increasing brain health.

“There’s no cost to any first line or for first responders,”  Dee O’Neill, head of executive and corporate solutions, said. They have access to our website they can choose whichever pieces they want to take advantage of. We’re trying to be really sensitive to their time. Everything is sort of in a really small chunk so they can easily fit it into a break or lunchtime or afterward the weekends or times they aren’t working.”

Part of the University of Texas at Dallas, The Center for BrainHealth is a research institute dedicated to preserving and strengthening brain health. The Center was able to raise $65,390 for the Stress Resilience program through the North Texas Giving Tuesday Now and a matching donation from a board member.

Because the program was just launched, it is too early to analyze its impact, but the center will continue to offer the program and will continue to look for funding in order to continue providing the program to frontline workers for free, O’Neill says.

“What we hope to do is follow some of the folks who actually go through the whole series or go through some of the sessions, so that we can see what’s the impact that they notice and what they find most valuable,” O’Neill said. “Then we’ll make changes from there, what’s been the feedback and what is the most helpful.”

Read full story on dmagazine.

Published on dmagazine July 2, 2020

The post Mental Health Support for North Texas’ Frontline Healthcare Workers appeared first on Center for BrainHealth.